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On Wednesday, the 21st of January 2015, Professor Corinne Hofman of Leiden University and the Ministry of Culture and the Grenada National Trust signed an MOU, agreeing scientific and cultural cooperation as part of the ?Nexus 1492 ERC-synergy? project.

Nexus 1492 ERC-synergy objectives
The ambition of NEXUS 1492 is to rewrite a crucial and neglected chapter in global history by focusing on transformations of indigenous, Amerindian cultures and societies across the historical divide of 1492. It investigates the impacts of colonial encounters in the Caribbean, the nexus of the first interactions between the New and the Old World.

Objective 1: Provide a new perspective on the first encounters between the New World and the Old World by focusing on the histories and legacies of the indigenous Caribbean across the historical divide and by addressing the complex intercultural interactions over the ensuing centuries.

Objective 2: Raise awareness of Caribbean histories and legacies, striving for practical outcomes in future heritage management efforts with implications for local communities, island nations, the pan-Caribbean region, and globally.

The first objective will be addressed by creating (1) a multi-scalar temporal (AD 1000-1800) and regional (pan-Caribbean) approach to Amerindian archaeology, specifically addressing the historical divide and thereby bridging the gap between pre-colonial and colonial histories, (2) a trans-disciplinary research design targeting the intercultural nexus of colonial encounters and Amerindian-African-European dynamics, and (3) a systematic approach to apply and develop cutting-edge multi-disciplinary methods and techniques.

The second objective will be reinforced by the involvement of Caribbean scholars and local communities in the proposed research agenda, enhancing international cooperation and a sense of ownership. Furthermore, a joint heritage agenda will be designed to mitigate loss of indigenous cultural remains caused by natural and human forces, and to raise historical awareness on local, regional, and global scales.

NEXUS 1492 addresses two main research questions:

  • What are the immediate and lasting effects of the colonial encounters on indigenous Caribbean cultures and societies and what were the intercultural dynamics that took place during the colonisation processes?
  • How can the study of indigenous Caribbean histories contribute to a more sophisticated awareness and to the design of a heritage programme that will speak to multiple and perhaps competing stakeholders at local, regional, pan-regional, and global scales?

MOU-Grenada-300x225Professor Hofman was also invited to give a lecture during a session at the Grenada National Museum on the Nexus project and its significance for Grenada.

During late March and Early April 2015, Grenada Museum Curator, Angus Martin will visit Leiden University to progress project.

A-ZA book that all Grenadians must have

Every now and again, you come across a piece of work or reference material, that is so relevant and majestic that you wonder how you’d missed it. This book is one of those cases, and I’m sure if I missed it, many thousands of Grenadians both at home and abroad did too. Whatever, the reason, the time has come to recognise and share this magnificent book.

It is packed with information that straightens out the history books once and for all. It’s presented in a style that is easily digested by all readers and every page holds text or images that capture the soul and essence of our beautiful tri-island state from every perspective.

I personally, have a passion for all things Grenadian, but must confess to having seen the title on the book shelves but passed it by as though it were written for tourists. I could not have been more wrong. This book has been compiled with a real since of love and passion for the content that resides within and the subject matter of Grenada. It is written with an understanding that much of our history has been misquoted or has been contradictory.

Marcus Garvey, once said “a people with no knowledge of its history, is like a tree without roots, it can not grow”. John Angus Martin, with this book, has given us a great foundation to piece together our history for current and future generations to embrace in their everyday lives.

This book should be in every Grenadian home wherever you reside on the planet. (MA, May 2013)

 

JAM_120pxAbout the Author

John Angus Martin was born and grew up in St. George?s, Grenada, where he attended the St. George?s Roman Catholic Boys? School (now known as the J.W. Fletcher Memorial Boys? School) and Presentation Brothers? College before immigrating to Brooklyn, New York with his family in 1978.

He graduated in 1986 with a BSc in Biological Sciences and a minor in Anthropology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook, Long Island.

He spent the next three years as a Peace Corps volunteer in Sierra Leone, West Africa, teaching at an agricultural institute and as an agricultural extension agent to subsistence farmers in rural villages. He has travelled widely in west and east Africa for work and as a visitor.

He holds master?s degrees in History, and Agricultural and Applied Economics from Clemson University, South Carolina. He?has worked?as aReference Archivist at the Cushing Memorial Library, Texas A&M University and a?Country Desk Officer in the Africa Region of the US Peace Corps,and traveled to many countries in west and east Africa. These travels have been important in his study of Caribbean slavery and colonialism.. He?is currently the director of the Grenada National Museum.?His next project,?French Grenada: Island Caribs and French Settlers, 1498-1763?explores the rise and demise of the French in Grenada, will be published in July.


 

What the reviews say:

Amazing!!!!,?January 12, 2008
This review is from:?A-Z of Grenada Heritage (MacMillan Caribbean) (Paperback)

It makes great reading for those of us who of Grenadian heritage but have lost the connection to our culture. The book provides valuable historical information that is often lost over time and is a wonderful tool that I can share with my daughter.

 


Dip Into A-Z of Grenada Heritage for Island Gems,?November 25, 2007

This review is from:?A-Z of Grenada Heritage (MacMillan Caribbean) (Paperback)

“A-Z of Grenada Heritage” is an oversized, 283-page, color illustrated [on quality paper] compendium of useful information about multiple aspects of the island of Grenada.

John Angus Martin writes to the point and provides facts of historical and contemporary information in an easily understandable manner. Excellently chosen photographs and illustrations catch one’s interest.
Martin backs up his knowledge with references.

A partial entry example:

“FISHERMAN’S BIRTHDAY is a Roman Catholic festival celebrated on 29 June each year as the feast of St. Peter and St. Paul. In the town of GOUYAVE, one of the largest fishing communities in the islands, festivities are the ‘grandest’ and are attended by visitors from all across Grenada. Under the French the parish was dedicated to St. Pierre, the patron saint of fishermen. After church services in each parish and the blessing of fishermen’s boats and nets, there are boat races, eating, drinking and merrymaking for the remainder of the day; the merrymaking dates to the mid-1960s . . .”

“A-Z of Grenada Heritage” is recommended for library ‘Country’ collections, for every travel and tourist-related organization’s reception area, for those who live on the Spice Isle, for those who visit Grenada, and for those who plan to visit Grenada.

The book is a delight; there’s nothing quite like it.


 

Great Book,?May 5, 2008

This review is from:?A-Z of Grenada Heritage (MacMillan Caribbean) (Paperback)

I was born in Grenada but grew up here in the US. My parents and other family members made sure that I knew my culture. Although I have been back there many times,after reading this book, I was able to get eeven more knowledge of all that was instilled in my cultural knowledge by them. It is a great conversation book between family and friends who are not from Grenada. Well worth the read and the money.


A valuable resource,?March 7, 2008
This review is from:?A-Z of Grenada Heritage (MacMillan Caribbean) (Paperback)

This book is a valuable resource for anyone seriously interested in Grenada. It is an enjoyable and informative read.

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?A-Z of Grenada,?November 20, 2010
This review is from:?A-Z of Grenada Heritage (MacMillan Caribbean) (Paperback)

It is good, Enjoying it….Well Please…Even though, like a Rasta, I have different opinion on many Subjects…But it is cool..Just have some over standing..You done know how that go….Seen!


A-Z Grenada Heritage,?December 16, 2008
This review is from:?A-Z of Grenada Heritage (MacMillan Caribbean) (Paperback)

This book provide a great overview of Grenada, it’s people and it’s culture. Great Read!!

 

The process of developing the 5 year strategic heritage plan commenced over 2 years ago and has seen several drafts. It is with great pleasure that the Trust can now present this plan for public consumption.

The main goals and objectives of the plan are:

The Goals

  1. To conserve to international standards the heritage assets of the nation, through professional implementation and monitoring.
  2. To maintain to international standards the heritage assets of the nation, through initiatives that encourage involvement of the people of Grenada in the beautification, upkeep and ultimate ownership of these assets.
  3. To increase visitors both internationally and locally to all heritage sites in Grenada, Carriacou and Petite Martinique by providing access to safe, enjoyable and well managed sites.
  4. To increase national awareness of the nation?s heritage assets, through dedicated marketing and PR initiatives that encourages involvement, and engages the us of all media platforms.
  5. To create a highly respected, visual and active national heritage organisation, driven by efficient, motivated, professional staff and volunteers.
  6. To develop the financial and professional capacity of the organisation to be effective custodians of Grenada?s heritage assets, including the generation of commercial income.
  7. To take the lead role in representations to both government and other parties in matters directly relating to heritage conservation and well being.
  8. To continually seek an increase in the organisation’s membership at both corporate and individual levels.

The Objectives

  • To have a minimum of 15 heritage properties or sites vested with the Trust by 2017.
  • To achieve annual direct income from tourist receipts of EC$650,000.00 by 2017.
  • To achieve an annual percentage of 10% of overall tourism revenue for heritage related income by 2017.
  • To increase direct employment within secretariat from 2 in 2013 to 5 by 2017.
  • To achieve direct site employment nationwide to 105 persons by 2017.
  • To increase site volunteer work force nationwide from 17 in 2013 to 155 by 2017.
  • To increase individual membership from 57 in 2013 to 2000 by 2017.
  • To increase corporate membership from 6 in 2013 to 50 by 2017.
  • To achieve 100% school membership by 2017.
  • To create reserve fund of EC$100,000.00 by 2017.

To download the entire document please click here

The significance of our fort systems is often glossed over by all but a few. Certainly, at the local level the general public are not aware of the potential pulling power of these magnificent structures.

In the 17th and 18th century Grenada was in a tug of war situation in which English and French forces alternated their ownership? of the island. The first attempted (British) settlement of the island in 1609 ended in a rout. A second (French) attempt in 1638 met with similar failure. Serious opposition by? indigenous inhabitants caused the newcomers to withdraw. Sustained European settlement was finally achieved (by the French) in 1649 with the construction of a fort in Beausejour and for the next 134 years the island?s fortification network was progressively enlarged to deal with? Anglo-French rivalries in the region. The matter was eventually settled in 1782 when the French Admiral de Grasse was comprehensively defeated by British Admiral Rodney at the Battle of the Saintes (near Dominica). This, and the resulting Treaty of Paris a year later, put a damper on? French ambitions in the West Indies and Grenada remained British for the next 200 years? or so,? until it was granted its? independence in 1974.

Over the years of Anglo French conflict in the region, a network of forts and? batteries? was erected. The main forts were located in and around the capital St George?s and the three most impressive ones still stand to this day : Fort George, Fort Mathew and Fort Frederick . A comprehensive network of batteries was also set up to discourage landings in the rest of the island. The West coast was equipped with a dozen coastal batteries and an additional six batteries were set up on the eastern side. An approach from the west was the preferred selection for an invasion of the island ?whereas ?the strong easterly winds made the east coast less appropriate for a landing. Additional fortifications were also set up in some of the promontories in the south east.

Progressive decommissioning of batteries has all but obliterated them but the main forts in St George?s remain and are well worth visiting.

Since the arrival of Curator, Mr. Angus Martin, the national museum has been treated to several outstanding exhibitions and talks that have captivated a cross generational audience. These presentations have put heritage and culture firmly back in the public domain.

John Angus Martin, referred to as Angus, is the author of the wonderful book, A-Z of Grenada Heritage. He has a passion for archives and has spent the best part of two decades collecting, locating and documenting all aspects of Grenadian heritage and culture.? Educating and sharing comes as second nature to Angus and his presentations to date, which have included maps of Grenada dating back centuries, postcards of Grenada and Art of Grenada have breathed fresh air into the Grenadian heritage and culture scene.

Over the coming weeks and months, there are plans for many more exhibitions and presentations both in the National Museum and on the road around Grenada. Some of these will involve collaboration with other heritage and culture stakeholders. There will of course be specific programmes developed to engage schools and youth in general.

Grenada’s heritage and culture goes well beyond the shores of our tri-island state and there are progressive plans in place to make consistent connections with the worldwide Grenadian Diaspora.

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The Grenada National Trust is pleased to announce that during the month of May 2013, we will be taking control of the management of the beautiful Priory House Property and its splendour gardens, situated in Church Street, St. George?s.

The Priory

The Priory is considered to be the most outstanding building of character in St. George?s, if not Grenada. Its beautiful Greek revival fa?ade, accented with Victorian details, projects a majestic presence along historic Church Street, once lined with some of the prettiest domestic houses in St. George?s Town. It is believed that The Priory or the ?Priests? House? was constructed in the late 1700s by the Roman Catholics as a Presbytery for the Dominican order. Over the years, it has seen a number of alterations, but a noted change was the addition of the front and the bay windows when the house was sold and renovated in 1917 after the Dominicans moved into the newly built Vicariate further up Church Street. Between 1996 and 2001, the property was fully renovated to an exceptional standard and has become the jewel of St. George?s Town, topping the Government?s list of official historic buildings. This gingerbread-style house remains quite unique to St. George?s Town and Grenada.

When the Grenada National Trust was approached about the possibility of managing this historic treasure, it jumped at the opportunity. The GNT is presently in negotiations with the owners of the Priory, Mrs. Pratizia and Mr. Pietro Banas, to develop a management plan for the operation of this property as a national historic building.

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The story of the Caribs last stand and their leap to certain death is known throughout the Caribbean, yet we struggle to commemorate this chapter in our history with the prominence it deserves. The Trust is seeking to use all available powers to remedy this situation.

Leapers? Hill or caribs? leap

The Island Caribs or Kalinago remain a symbol for the people of Grenada and the Caribbean because of their fierce resistance to European colonization. Thus, the Leapers? Hill site, where more than forty of them jumped to their deaths on the night of 30 May 1650, represents an heroic self sacrifice that left them a legacy of resistance. That bloody event is remembered with reverence throughout Grenada and the Caribbean and continues to hold great symbolism over three centuries later. As such, the site at Leapers? Hill is hallowed ground in the post-Columbian struggles between Amerindians and Europeans for control of the region, and should be accorded the due respect and commemoration it deserves.

To that end, the Grenada National Trust will seek to make this an official national historical site. It is the plan of the GNT to work with the Government of Grenada and other stakeholders, including the local community, to reopen the interpretation centre and develop the site as a primary part of our educational and visitor attraction. The interpretation centre will provide up-to-date information on the history of the Kalinagos in Grenada and their struggles against European invasion. It will host local students on field trips and visitors who come in search of an understanding of this tragic event that left an enduring legacy to the indigenous community. Its ultimate goal is to remove the sadness and anger this solitary hill may evoke, by providing a fitting memorial to the Kalinagos. It will promote their heritage so that we can celebrate those who valiantly fought to defend and preserve their way of life in the face of an unprecedented onslaught against their culture and persons. Please join us in making this endeavour a success by supporting the efforts of the Grenada National Trust.